The LogicMonitor Collector monitors your infrastructure and collects the data defined by LogicModules for each resource in that location. See About the LogicMonitor Collector.

This article will guide you through basic steps for adding a Collector. For more details about each of the options, see the main topic Installing Collectors.

Installation Settings

Collectors are added from Settings:

  • If you’re starting from the new account wizard, then you’ve just created your first user and are now being presented with the Add a Collector dialog.
  • If you’ve already exited or completed the wizard, you can open the Add a Collector dialog by navigating to Settings | Collectors | Add | Collector, as shown next.

Follow the steps in the Add a Collector dialog to complete and verify the Collector installation.

Installation Instructions

The Add a Collector instructions assume that you have already decided which device your Collector will be installed on. This may be a syslog server, DNS server, or other relatively unconstrained server that is part of the infrastructure environment you want to monitor. You do not need to install a Collector on every device, instead one Collector on a server should be used to monitor all the resources in that location.

1. Choose Where to Install a Collector

The Collector should be installed on a Windows or Linux (physical or virtual) server that can make outgoing calls to discover and gather data from your infrastructure. If you want to collect data from Windows systems, the Collector must be installed on a Windows server.

Monitor the Device on Which the Collector Is Installed

Check the option: Monitor the Device on which the Collector is installed to track the performance of the Collector’s host. This will allow you to monitor CPU utilization, disk usage, and other metrics to ensure that the Collector is running and keeping up with its data collection load. See Monitoring Your Collectors.

Device Group

Use the dropdown to select the Device Group this collector will be part of. If you leave the device group “Ungrouped”, LogicMonitor will automatically add it to the dynamic group “Collectors”. See Device Groups Overview.

2. Select a Collector

In the Select a Collector area of the Add a Collector dialog box (shown next), select the download file you will install, its version, and size (which correlates to monitoring capacity). You also have the option of assigning the new Collector to a Collector Group.

Select Collector Download File

Select the appropriate Collector download file for your server:

  • 32 bit or 64 bit Windows
  • 32 bit or 64 bit Linux

Select Collector Version

Select among the available General Release and Early Release Collectors:

  • General Release Collectors. General Release Collectors are our most stable Collector versions available. We recommend this Collector version for the majority of your infrastructure.
  • Early Release Collectors. Early Release Collectors offer new features and functionality, but we cannot guarantee that they are perfectly stable and bug-free. For this reason, we recommend that you use an Early Release Collector version only when it has features from which you would benefit. If you have a large deployment, we don’t recommend this Collector version for your entire infrastructure.

Note: You can always change your Collector version by uninstalling and re-installing a Collector.

Select Collector Size

The Collector size refers to the monitoring capacity for the Collector.The number of resources that a Collector can monitor depends on the data collection method that it uses (such as SNMP, JDBC, WMI, and so on). See Collector Capacity.

You can choose from four available Collector sizes:

  • Nano. This Collector is intended for testing purposes and not recommended for production environments. It does not have a memory requirement as it will consume less than 1GB of system memory and will monitor a limited number of Resources.
  • Small. This Collector will consume approximately 2GB of system memory and is capable of monitoring roughly 200 (Linux Collector) or 100 (Windows Collector) Resources.
  • Medium. This Collector will consume approximately 4GB of system memory and is capable of monitoring roughly 1000 (Linux Collector) or 500 (Windows Collector) Resources.
  • Large. This Collector will consume approximately 8GB of system memory and is capable of monitoring roughly 2000 (Linux Collector) or 750 (Windows Collector) Resources.

Assign the Collector to a Collector Group

From the Collector Group field, you may assign your new Collector to an existing Collector Group or use the + icon to the right of the field to create a new group on the fly. Collector Groups pool your Collectors based on factors such as their physical locations, their environments (e.g. QA, development, or production), or- if you are an MSP- customer. This streamlines the process of configuring permission settings and managing your Collectors. For more information on Collector Groups, see Collector Groups.

3. Download and Install

This section overviews the steps and strategies for:

Installing a Windows Collector

To install a Windows Collector:

  1. You can either install your Collector using the new account setup wizard or from the Settings tab of your account if you’ve already exited or completed the wizard.
    • If you’re starting from the new account wizard, then you’ve just created your first user and are being prompted to select installation settings (e.g. Collector type, version, etc.) for your first Collector.
    • If you’re starting from the Settings tab, click Add in the Collectors section, establish the installation settings and click Next.
  2. Once you’ve downloaded the installer, open it. This will start the Install Shield Wizard on Windows. The Install Shield Wizard will extract the binary and prompt you for credentials.These credentials will correspond to the account that the Collector will run under. If other Windows systems will not be monitored by this Collector, you can run the services as Local System. Otherwise, consider specifying a domain account that is a local administrator for all the Windows computers to be monitored with a password set not to expire. Running the Collector in this context greatly reduces the likelihood of authentication issues, as the account should be able to access and query all monitored computers. If the computer hosting the Collector is not part of a domain, it is recommended that you run the Collector service as a local administrator account.

    The supported Windows credentials are:

    • Collector and monitored resources in domain, Collector running as domain account with local administrator privileges.
    • Collector and monitored resources not in domain, Collector running as local administrator account, and connecting to each host with local administrator credentials. For more information, see Credentials for accessing remote Windows computers.

    Note: As discussed in the Troubleshooting Windows Collectors area of this support article, the LogicMonitor Collector service must be granted “Log on as a service” under “Local Policy/User Rights Assignment” in the host OS local security policy settings.

  3. If the Windows OS where your Collector is installed is protected by an antivirus application, you will need to put in place a recursive exclusion for the LogicMonitor Collector application directory, as discussed in About the LogicMonitor Collector.

Installing a Linux Collector

Note: Beginning with Collector version EA28.500/GD28.003, the Bourne shell (sh) is required for the Linux installation script. The Bourne shell and most other dependencies are universal on Linux, but you may need to install the “vim-common” package on CentOS MinimalCD distributions to get the “xxd” binary the installer depends on.

To install a Linux Collector:

  1. You can either install your Collector using the new account setup wizard or from the Settings tab of your account if you’ve already exited or completed the wizard.
    • If you’re starting from the new account wizard, then you’ve just created your first user and are being prompted to select installation settings (e.g. Collector type, version, etc.) for your first Collector.
    • If you’re starting from the Settings tab, click Add in the Collectors section, establish the installation settings and click Next.
  2. If your server supports web browsing, you can download the installer directly to your server. Otherwise, you can either use cURL or Wget to download the installer to your server, or you can download the installer on another computer and use scp to copy it over to your server. If you intend to use cURL or Wget, use the ‘get cURL cmd’ or ‘get Wget cmd’ buttons to copy the download command directly to your clipboard.

    Note: In Linux environments with Collectors running in containers, the Collector must run as root. SUID root is /bing/ping.

  3. You can SSH into your Linux server, and paste the copied command to download the installer to your server: 

  4. Next change the permissions and make the binary executable, and then run the executable: 

Installing Using the Bootstrap

You will notice “bootstrap” and “full package” options under the “Download a Collector” stage. The bootstrap is a smaller installation package (~500kB) that enables you to download and install Collectors much faster via the LogicMonitor CDN, whereas the “full package” option is approximately 200MB.

4. Verify Connection

After successfully installing the Collector on your Windows or Linux server, return to the “Add a Collector” dialog in LogicMonitor and verify that the Collector can communicate with LogicMonitor’s datacenters.

Troubleshooting Collectors

If you have any issues with your Collectors, check the Troubleshooting Collectors articles. We’ve also compiled some troubleshooting tips specifically for Windows and Linux:

Next Steps

After you’ve installed a Collector, you can start adding resources to be monitored.

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