Websites

Website Properties

Introduction to Website Properties

Properties can be added to your LogicMonitor websites to facilitate organization, customize alert message templates, set authentication credentials, and more. You can set website properties at the individual website level, website group level, and at the root group (account) level. As shown next, website properties, once established, can be viewed from the Info tab.

Understanding Property Hierarchies

Before you set properties for your websites, you should decide where to set them. Ultimately, this decision depends on how many websites a property applies to. For example:

  • A property that applies to all or most websites should be set at the root account level
  • A property that applies to multiple websites should be set at a group level
  • A property that applies to just one website should be set at the individual website level

Properties cascade down the Website tree until they are overridden. For example, if the same property is set at the website group level and individual website level, the individual website takes precedence. As a best practice, we recommend that you set global credentials and override them as needed for groups of websites or individual websites.

Adding a Property

Website properties can be added when first creating the website, or can be added later. The following set of steps illustrate how to add a property to an existing website, a website group, or the Websites tree root.

  1. Navigate to the Websites page.
  2. Navigate to the level at which you want to assign the property: root, website group, or website.
  3. Click the Manage button in the top right corner of the Websites page.
  4. Scroll down to the Properties section of the Manage dialog.
  5. Click the + button to add a property name and value.

    Note: Existing property values can be edited from this section as well by simply placing your cursor into the Value field.

  6. Click the Save button to save the new property. Click the Save button again to exit out of the Manage dialog.

Example: Using Properties for Authentication

A common use for website properties is for authentication. Username and password properties can be established and then passed in as tokens when authenticating requests, as shown next.

Note: In a real application, LogicMonitor will mask the password as hard-coded passwords are also supported, but as shown above for effect, the password can be passed in as a property as well.

Setting credentials as properties (vs. hard coding credentials into the authorization fields of a Web Check) is useful when there are multiple websites requiring the same authentication credentials. These websites can be grouped together and username and password properties can be set at the group level. With this setup, the process of updating authentication credentials is trivial, requiring only a single update. Additionally, websites that are subsequently added to the group will automatically inherit the correct username and password properties.